Us Mexico Tomato Agreement

The U.S. Commerce Department said the deal sets benchmark prices for towers and Roma at 31 cents a pound, tomatoes at 46 cents a pound, tomatoes on the vine at 50 cents a pound, unspecialty tomatoes at 49 cents a pound and special tomatoes at 59 cents a pound. Price adjustments are limited to USDA inspection fees and transportation costs attributable to defective tomatoes. The exchanges consulted with Mexican producers/exporters of fresh tomatoes and ETPs and reviewed stakeholder comments on the proposed suspension of the anti-dumping investigation. In accordance with Section 734 (c) of the Act, we found that there were exceptional circumstances in this case, as defined in Section 734 (c) (2) (A) of the Act. Disputes between the United States and Mexico over tomatoes have been going on for years, before U.S. President Donald Trump`s term. 6. When calculating the transaction price for lots subject to a right to adjust to quality and status defects within the meaning of the case defined above, tomatoes classified as DEFECTIVE are considered rejected and not sold. 4. No later than 30 days after the end of the quarter,[43] each signatory must present a certificate to the trade. As part of a contractual agreement, the signatories require their distribution partners to submit the information necessary for inclusion in the quarterly certificate of the signatories. Each signatory agrees to authorize the full verification of its certification if the trade deems it necessary.

Signatories can obtain a copy of the proposed forms for the presentation of quarterly certification information on the Commerce website at enforcement.trade.gov/-Tomate below. Quarterly certifications must be subject to e-commerce, including Microsoft Excel`s statement on all data it contains. Certification must include: 1. Sold directly to a processor (i.e., the first buyer of tomatoes for processing in the United States must be an effective processor); Mexican producers vigorously denied allegations of dumping and unfair practices and argued that Florida`s declining tomato industry was due to its difficulties in producing quality and affordable products.

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